A Christmas 2015 Letter from Roseau Dominica

Season's Greetings to you from my home in Dominica, West Indies!

Season’s Greetings to you from my home in Dominica, West Indies!

Dear Readers of Ti Domnik Tales:

Merry Christmas from the Nature Isle!  I know it’s been a while since I have posted a note. Please accept my apologies for the delay.  I have been concentrating on preparing for an advanced level French exam here at Alliance Francaise for the past couple of months.  I only completed it just before Christmas.  You might also be curious to know that following Tropical Storm Erika and its devastating aftermath, I was not inclined to venture far from my home, for safety’s sake, as the ground was unstable and hiking trails (and roads) had to be cleared of storm debris.

However, I have recently traversed the island to spend a few wonderful

I appreciated a little 'dwon-time' in a lovely cottage opposite this one at Beau Rive, near Castle Bruce, Dominica.

I appreciated a little ‘down-time’ in a lovely cottage opposite this one at Beau Rive, near Castle Bruce, Dominica.

DSCF6311

This gorgeous angel adorned the top of the Christmas tree at the Beau Rive boutique hotel near Castle Bruce, Dominica.

days and nights at the charming Beau Rive boutique hotel near Castle Bruce on the east coast.   I am delighted to report that the roads are in good condition, and it was an easy journey through the mountains of the island’s interior. I will certainly be venturing further afield in the New Year, as bailey bridges have been erected across rivers where the previous structures had been washed away and most of the roads are motorable.

But life has not completely returned to normal here, as dozens of people who lost homes and properties as a result of the storm are being temporarily housed as they await new homes, which are presently being built by the Government of Dominica in safer areas.  Repairs to infrastructure are ongoing, and it is possible to completely enjoy the offerings of the Nature Island.  However,  it is important to remember that the destructive effects of global warming/climate change are leaving their marks, as evidenced in vulnerable countries and small island states such as Dominica.

This spectacular ocean view and teh crashing waves in Richmond provided the perfect back-drop for my year-end contemplation.

This spectacular ocean view and the crashing waves in Richmond Bay below Beau Rive provided the perfect back-drop for my year-end contemplation.

My recent break at Beau Rive was, in effect, a mini-retreat and pause for reflection over the past year, as well as an opportunity to document intentions for 2016. In this peaceful setting, I was able to look back on 2015, and recognize that my life in Dominica had changed to some degree, as I  actually spent more than four months abroad – some of it in Paris to attend the wedding of my wonderful French friends Carole and Gildas in January, followed by an extended ‘vacation’ in Canada as a result of Tropical Strom Erika.  That summer sojourn lasted from mid-June until the end of September. My delay resulted from the destruction  of the Douglas-Charles airport, which was quickly repaired within one month, thanks to the generous assistance and technical support of several caring countries.

While visiting with Mark, the Managing Director at Beau Rive and Angela, one of his repeat guests (17 times!), I paid close attention to our conversations.  In my quest for inspiration about the forthcoming year, I listened attentively to what was said that particularly resonated with me.  Suffice to say that our discussions centred on thinking of others who are less fortunate and being mindful of what we can do to make the world a better place in which to live. I also admired Angela’s personal strength and determination to have a fulfilling and rewarding life, and to not let any type of obstacle prevent her from living out her dreams.  Above all, I felt surrounded by kindness, consideration and good will.  I returned home with uplifted spirits and hope for a brighter future by  setting intentions to consciously spread good cheer (in any form)all year round.

I have much to be thankful for and I wish to express gratitude to all those who have  touched my life in very meaningful ways this past year.  In particular, I am grateful to my family in Canada for their support and encouragement, and for hosting me for an extended period when I was ‘storm-stayed’ in Canada.  I also appreciate the generous gesture of my niece Mara and my nephew Dallin, who willingly offered their usual Christmas present from me to help those in need in Dominica. I also wish to thank Canadian-Caribbean writer and friend Susan M. Toy, who included my blogs (Ti Domnik Tales and Canary Gal) on her list of notable authors for 2015.  She is the perfect example of someone who thinks of others with a giving heart while  happily pursuing her own career.

DSCF6281In the past couple of months, I was also profoundly moved by the positive results arising from the COP 21 climate action accord in Paris.  As well, I enthusiastically participated in Dominica’s week of thoughtful international documentaries about climate change, which was organized by Alliance Francaise. These sessions culminated in

During Dominica's 'Day of Action' , I was surrounded by new friends and old friends of like mind with respect to environmental responsibilities. From Left: new friends Dan and Maria and old friends Wendy and Liz.

During Dominica’s ‘Day of Action’ , I was surrounded by new friends and old friends of like mind with respect to environmental responsibilities. From left: new friends Dan and Maria and old friends Wendy and Liz.

Dominica’s Day of Action, coordinated by the Waitukubuli Ecological Foundation. While the attendees were small in number, the spirit of the movement was very big, and I congratulate all participants who are leading by example in Dominica.

During Dominca's Day of Action, children and adults created a waterfall from plastic bottles in the Botannical Gardens. The irony is not lost on me!

During Dominica’s ‘Day of Action’, children and adults created a waterfall from plastic bottles in the Botanical Gardens. The irony is not lost on me!

During this event, I made friends with two young people, Maria and Dan. Although we were just becoming acquainted, I really admired their passion, determination and dedication to eliminating and reducing environmental concerns on the Nature Island and of course, globally.

As the sun sets on 2015, I welcome the New Year with joy, hope, peace and love!

As the sun sets on 2015, I welcome the New Year with joy, hope, peace and love!

Despite the ravages of Tropical Storm Erika, Dominica’s resilience is apparent everywhere.

As 2015 draws to a close, I will send off this post to you, with warmest wishes for a peaceful, loving and caring New Year.  I hope that your adventures will be fruitful, and that you will give careful consideration to how you can make the world a better place now – and for the future!

The joy of life is the adventure! Photo taken in Montmartre, Paris in January 2015.

The joy of life is the adventure! Photo taken in Montmartre, Paris, France in January 2015.

I’ll be in touch in 2016, as I share my journey on the sensational Nature Island – and elsewhere!

Sincerely,

Gwendominica

 

 

 

Two Months after Tropical Storm Erika: An Independence Season of Reflection, Renewal and Hope

Morne Trois Pitons towers over the island's interior on a beautiful day several weeks after Tropical Storm Erika. A land slide on the right bank can be seen here.

Morne Trois Pitons towers over the island’s interior on a beautiful day several weeks after Tropical Storm Erika. A landslide on the right bank can be seen here.

As Dominica continued to recover from the devastating after-effects caused by Tropical Storm Erika, this year’s Independence

activities reflected the overall mood of the nation with quiet celebrations and ongoing efforts to rebuild the country.

I was on-island for about a month before I ventured beyond the environs of Roseau. My neighbour’s mother, with whom I was acquainted had recently passed away

The Wesley Catholic Church is a beautiful house of worship on Dominica's northeast coast.

The Wesley Catholic Church is a beautiful house of worship on Dominica’s northeast coast.

and I honoured her memory by attending her funeral in Wesley, on the northeast coast of the island. Buses had been organized to take attendees across the mountainous interior, and I was fortunate to take a front seat for the best view of the terrain.  Of course, my camera was in hand, as I was curious to capture the current state of the land one month after my return.

While major landslides had been cleared, there was still evidence of instability with occasional mounds of dirt and stones blocking one

The Layou River overflowed its banks in the area of the village of Bells, in Dominica's interior.

The Layou River overflowed its banks near the village of Bells, in Dominica’s interior, leaving severely eroded banks following T.S. Erika.

lane of the  interior highway.  As well, this main road had been undermined in several locations where it followed along the course of  powerful rivers, such as the Layou and the Laurent near Bells, deep in the Heart of Dominica. Restoration works were also well underway around the perimeter of Douglas-Charles

Morne Diablotin, Dominica's highest mountain forms a misty backdrop to the repair works underway at the Douglas-Charles Airport.

Morne Diablotin, Dominica’s highest mountain forms a misty backdrop to the repair works underway at the Douglas-Charles Airport.

Airport at Melville Hall, following the repair and reopening of the runway where I had  safely landed a few weeks earlier.

When I arrived at Wesley, I joined hundreds of others at the Catholic Church in that village for the funeral of Theresa Gordon.  We collectively paid tribute to a lady who was obviously very well  respected by all who knew her or her immediate family. Despite the sadness of the occasion, it was clearly evident to me that feelings of love and good will prevailed.  I think that ‘Ma Gordon”, as I called her, would have been very happy about that and I was moved by the positive atmosphere that surrounded me there.  I was reminded once again, that despite tragedy and loss, Dominicans are a very resilient people who determinedly ‘carry on’, no matter what challenges they have endured!

Cartwheel Cafe offers tasty breakfasts - not just on Creole Day, but every day! The seasoned codfish, boiled egg and breadfruit makes a very filling meal.

Cartwheel Cafe offers tasty breakfasts – not just on Creole Day, but every day! The seasoned codfish, boiled egg and breadfruit make a very filling meal.

This year, persistent inclement weather put a bit of a damper on Creole Day

Many seamstresses create beautiful variations on traditional Creole wear - for all shapes and sizes!

Skilled seamstresses create beautiful variations on traditional Creole wear – for all shapes and sizes!

festivities, but it did not prevent me from enjoying delicious traditional foods, especially the vegetarian and fish varieties. And I always enjoy the seasonal fashions, created with bright madras fabrics, although I was more subdued with my style of  dress this year. The spirit of the season was definitely ‘out there’, but in a low key and respectful

Simone at Kai-K Boutique poses beside the manequin beside Cartwheel Cafe on the Bayfront.

Simone at Kai-K Boutique poses beside the mannequin close to Cartwheel Cafe on the Bayfront.

way.With the cancellation of the World Creole Music Festival and Creole in the Park  due to the post-T.S. Erika situation, the streets were much quieter too.

Who is this' belle dame'? If you think you know, let me know!

Who is this’ belle dame’? If you think you know, let me know!

It is my usual annual habit to breakfast at Cartwheel Café on the Bayfront in Roseau. The staff is consistently in high spirits, and clients always seem to be in a Creole mood as they eat and chat with each other, which suits me fine!

Piano teacher Leanne looks very sweet in a lavender/rose-hued madras blouse, with matching lipstick and eye glass frames!

Piano teacher Leanne looks very sweet in a lavender/rose-hued madras blouse, with matching lipstick and eye-glass frames!

I devoured my codfish and breadfruit breakfast there, then wandered the streets searching for the Creole spirit.  I did find it here and there, and took pleasure from conversations with friends and strangers. When it began to rain more heavily,

I couldn't wait to take a bite from this avacodo/accras infused whole wheat bake from Stone Love Ital Shop on Cross St. in Roseau.

I couldn’t wait to take a bite from this avocado/accras infused whole wheat ‘bake’ from Stone Love Ital Shop on Cross St. in Roseau.

I purchased a large cup of tangy pomme-citan juice and an avocado vegan accras ‘bake’ from Stone Love Ital Shop. Then I picked up a few slices of rum cake and banana cake from the Urban Garden Café around the corner before heading home to savour these treats a little later.  (More on those two wonderful  natural foods eateries in the next post!)

I feasted on these filling avacado/farine (cassava flour) balls made by Marvo and staff at her snackette on Independence Street.

I feasted on these filling avocado/farine (cassava flour) balls made by Marvo and staff at her popular snackette on Independence Street.

I do confess to indulging in a delicious  vegetarian pizza  at Fusion Village Restaurant in the heart of Roseau  the next day.

It was wonderful to meet with my 'sister' Liz and friend Nancy (photographer) for pizza adn treats at the Fusion Village Restaurant over the Independence weekend.

It was wonderful to meet with my ‘sister’ Liz and friend Nancy (photographer) for pizza and treats at the Fusion Village Restaurant in Roseau over the Independence weekend.

However, the

I met up with other Creole-inspired friends at the Roseau Market: Anne (l) from Papillote Wilderness Retreat in Trafalgar Karen from Roots Farm Organic Produce in Cochrane.

I met up with other Creole-inspired friends at the  Saturday Roseau Market: Anne (l) from Papillote Wilderness Retreat in Trafalgar and Karen from Roots Farm Organic Produce in Cochrane.

objective was to meet and spend time with good friends with whom I hadn’t really connected since my return from Canada.  Our lengthy lunch  and catch-up certainly added to my personal enjoyment of this unique Creole Season. Thanks Nancy and Liz!

The Freewinds Cruise Ship glowed at the Roseau Cruise Ship Berthon the evening of Kai & Vicki's Kids' Charity fundraiser in aid of children in need in Dominica

The Freewinds Cruise Ship glowed with anticipation at the Roseau Cruise Ship Berth on the evening of Kai & Vicki’s Kids’ Charity fundraiser in aid of needy children in Dominica.

Independence celebrations were far from over, but the highlight for me was the special fundraising concert that I had the pleasure of attending on the Freewinds Cruise Ship on Sunday November 1st.At this auspicious occasion, internationally renowned Dominican singer Michele Henderson offered her talents, along with the Freewinds band and other first class musicians from the Nature Island in aid of the Kai & Vickie Kids’ Charity, which

Vickie & Kai hold up an autographed West Indies Cricket Team shirt, which was auctioned off on the spot!

Vickie & Kai (after whom the charity is named)hold up an autographed West Indies Cricket Team shirt, which was auctioned off  for a ‘steal’ on the spot!

Michele is a phenomenal flautist, as well as a powerful singer, with a brilliant and versatile soprano voice.

Michele is a phenomenal flautist, as well as a powerful singer, with a brilliant and versatile soprano voice.

supports underprivileged children locally.

Michele opened the performance with some well known songs from Dominica. Her husband Junior is on bass guitar.

Michele opened the performance with some well-known songs from Dominica. Her husband Junior is on bass guitar.

Michele's daughter Kai jams with mum and her version of Purple Rain, which closed the show. The Free Winds bassist backs them up.

Michele’s daughter Kai jams with mum and her version of Purple Rain, which closed the show. The Free Winds bassist backs them up.

As usual, this amazing artiste delivered a world-class performance to the delight of the  enthralled audience, comprised of local politicians, foreign diplomats, citizens, expatriates and children.  Michele has the uncanny ability to easily cross musical genres, and as such everyone got a taste of different styles of local and popular music. I love it all, but I am partial to Dominica’s cadence, which is a specialty of this exceptional lyricist, composer and singer. To her credit, she also surprised us by presenting some rising stars on the Nature Isle, and everyone appreciated their obvious potential.

With a few hundred people filling the performance space, and an

Michele is one of Dominica's pride and joys. She is also a Goodwill Ambassador for her country.

Michele is one of Dominica’s pride and joys. She is also a Goodwill Ambassador for her country.

auction of some enticing goods and services, I am certain that this charity raised several thousand dollars.  These monies will directly aid children who were adversely affected by T.S. Erika in numerous ways.

It’s impossible to walk away from a Michele Henderson performance (and I’ve been fortunate to have heard her countless times over the years) without feeling inspired, uplifted, joyful and hopeful.  Music of that calibre has a way of bringing people together, which was most fitting for the mood of this unique Independence season on Dominica.

Because I did get chilled in the a/c on the ship and then walked a distance through a persistent drizzle in the cool night air, I did succumb to the sniffles the next day.  By Independence morning, I was ‘under the weather’, so I gave those  official festivities a miss this year.  However, if you’d like to see some photos, you can find them on Dominica News Online  for November 3, 2015.

Plastic is a huge polluter, no matter where we live on the planet. Please think before you throw. It's the least we can do to protect our earthly environment.

Plastic is a huge polluter, no matter where we live on the planet. Please think before you throw. It’s the least we can do to protect our earthly environment.

By the next morning, I was thankful to have rested the day before, as it was National Day of Community Service and I had made a pact with myself that I would do something for my neighbourhood.  I am not much good at hoisting a shovel, but I can certainly put on a back pack filled with garbage bags – and that is what I did.  It was a hot, humid morning, and I was guaranteed a healthy sweat – just what I needed.  I started at the top of the main road in my subdivision and worked my way down to the junction at the bottom of the hill, which is part of my usual walking route.  If I did this stretch at a normal pace, it would take me half an hour total to go down and back up to my home.  But with rubber gloves, hiking boots, and four and a half garbage bags filled with curb-side debris, the activity actually took  over three hours.  Although I was really fatigued by this exercise, I felt good that perhaps I had made a tiny difference on my beloved Nature Island . There were many formal projects taking place all over the country, and significant numbers came out to lend a hand.  I got the distinct impression that the tragedies and losses incurred as a result of T.S. Erika, prompted  people to pull together to restore Dominica to her former glory.

Despite plentiful rainshowers during Dominica's 37th Independence season, there were a few gorgeous sunsets, such as this one!

Despite plentiful rain showers during Dominica’s 37th Independence season, there were a few gorgeous sunsets, such as this one!

After a good rest, I ended my energetic day with a refreshing and relaxing  ‘sea bath’ as the sun set on Independence 2015. I floated on the calm and soothing waters,  and reflected on the power of hope and the realization that Dominica shall indeed renew herself, and rise again.

On the Ground in Dominica: Recovery After Tropical Storm Erika is in Full Swing!

Through the taxi window, the mountains of Dominica look as lush and stunning as ever. But benath them, it's a different matter!

Through the plane window, the mountains of Dominica look as lush and stunning as ever. But beneath them, it’s a different matter, thanks to TS Erika!

Readers may be wondering about my return to Dominica from Canada, so I will briefly report here.  Unfortunately, I do not have many photos to include  at this time, but you can always scroll through Dominica News Online or through the Facebook page of Honourable Roosevelt Skerrit, Prime Minister of Dominica for visuals

When I arrived at Douglas-Charles airport on Tuesday afternoon, September 29th, it was truly a beautiful day on the Nature Island. The flight from Barbados was smooth and uneventful.  My seat companion , who was headed home to St. Kitts, told me he had never flown in to Dominica before.  When he gazed out the window at the slopes filled with coconut palms, he gasped in amazement.  He had never seen so many of those trees before.  I told him that my wish would be to partake of their delicious jelly coconut water, if they hadn’t all fallen off of the trees during Erika!

When I disembarked from the aircraft, I turned around slowly on the tarmac. The cleared runway stood out starkly against the rocks, broken pavement and debris that lined it.  I proceeded to take a few photos, but was quickly informed by an airport security guard who ran over to me that photographs were prohibited.  While the officer did not demand that I remove the shots from my camera, I assured her that I would not publish them.  Therefore, please refer to the sites above to get a sense of the rapid recovery underway at Dominica’s main airport.

I think everyone else in the shuttle taxi must have seen the devastation before, as I seemed to be the only one who loudly exclaimed shock and dismay as we travelled through the mountainous interior en route to Roseau. The reality of this startling situation really hit home when we encountered not one, but two landslides along the roadway that traverses the Central Forest Reserve. The driver skillfully manouevered the single lane of broken rocks one moment only to be immediately delayed at another larger slide.  We waited on the road for about 20 minutes while a large caterpillar cleared the blocked area. On that dry, sunny day, I  realized that it did not have to be raining for the ground to ‘give-way’ and that the earth must still  be  unstable.  Right then and there, I decided that I would be Roseau-bound for a while, as I did not care to encounter falling rocks on any of my forays!

As we moved along, I stared in horror when we rounded the sharp turn and the seemingly-rickety bridge over the River

The taxi was moving too fast fro me to capture the work being done to restore the road and river banks located near RiverStone Bar and Grill in Bells, Dominica. Thankfully, the establishent was not damaged extensively.

The taxi was moving too fast for me to capture the work being done (background) to restore the road, bridge and river banks located near RiverStone Bar and Grill in Bells, Dominica. Thankfully, the establishent was not damaged extensively.

Laurent, which passes very near to the RiverStone Bar and Grill, one of my favourite places in Dominica.  The river bed looked as if it had expanded to four times its size, and huge boulders covered the terrain as far as I could see. Instantly, I was alarmed and wondered why I had not heard about any storm-related problems at this popular establishment, which is not visible from the roadside.  Later that evening,  I checked RiverStone’s facebook page, and was subsequently assured by propietor Maxine that all is well and  that they will reopen for business very soon, after completing some renovations.

As we headed west and approached the  Springfield area, I could see that the main road had been badly eroded, and at one point, there was a clear view of the Springfield River from the ‘highway’, which was never there before.  When we finally reached the West Coast road heading into Roseau, I gazed up into the mountains, now east of me, and was stunned at the changed landscape due to numerous  gigantic landslides in the interior.

While the appearance of Roseau was more or less the same to me, I was reminded of the flooding – and then I noticed the bridges across the Roseau River.  There is much work to be done and two of the three are closed at the moment, causing considerable congestion and a necessary re-routing of traffic during rush hours.

When I was almost home, I again gasped when I saw the rocky expansion of the banks of the once tiny river at Castle Comfort.  Mind you, the volume of water has returned to normal.  I was relieved that all was well at my home, thanks to my good neighbours who were mentioned in this post.

The weather is very hot and steamy.  Abnormally high temperatures are affecting all of the Caribbean islands. At this writing, there are no hurricanes in the forecast, but the season does continue until November 30th. Please keep Dominica and all the other islands in your prayers and send us plenty of good vibes!

In the hurricane zone, all Caribbean countries are vulnerable. I think of Michelle, proprietor of the lovely Lazy Tulip Cafe in Barrie, Ontario, Canada, whose ‘second home’ in the Bahamas was devastated by Category 4 Hurricane Joaquin this past weekend.  She wrote to me today, stating that: “[W]e are living in a parallel universe as I sit here now in the same shoes you were in a few weeks ago. Rum Cay got hit by Joaquin and is currently in a state of devastation. I set up this Facebook page in hopes of communicating!” https://www.facebook.com/rumcaycommunity Please take a look at this site.  Perhaps there is some way you could help those folks out too. These days, we just never know when or where disaster will strike!

By now, I have heard and read some sensational stories of bravery, ingenuity, compassion and resilience on the Nature Island.  I won’t repeat them all here right now, but there are a few that really stand out and prove to me that drama does not always have to be a work of fiction! In the coming weeks, I intend to share some of the incredible actions that have taken place in an effort to preserve and continue with life in as normal a manner as possible, given the extreme dire circumstances that have arisen since Erika.

Suffice to say that I now firmly believe in the resilience of the human spirit, as clearly evidenced by those who have been adversely affected by this severe storm.  I am also encouraged by the level of compassion that has been demonstrated by all of the donors worldwide, who have shown that they really care about this beautiful little Caribbean island called Dominica – my adopted home!

I understand that cash donations are still needed and are now a priority, as Dominica begins the lengthy rebuilding process.  If you have not already done so, or would like to do so again, please consult the first paragraph of this post for a list of Government of Dominica approved bank accounts and organizations. The people of Dominica are very grateful for your help!

Poems About Dominica Inspired by the 2015 Nature Island Literary Festival’s Writing Competition

For the first time in several years, I was in Canada when the 8th annual Nature Island Literary Festival  (NILF)took place in early August. I have always enjoyed the fascinating sessions and stimulating interactions with literary artists from Dominica and abroad. This year, a Nature Island Writing Competition formed part of the festivities. I was inspired to ‘try my hand’ in a genre in which I had little  practical experience, with the exception of enjoying the study of a variety of poems on the syllabus that I taught in senior English  literature classes at Orion Academy  a few years ago. My humble submission was a way of staying connected to this wonderful and popular annual event!

As the theme of nature and the environment particularly intrigued me, I felt compelled to draft the required entry of three poems as I waited for my flight to Canada at the Barbados International Airport in mid-June.  I applied some of the literary devices and techniques that I had explained to my eager students  when we analyzed poems once upon a time. (They should smile when they read that!). I even revised the pieces on the plane, which I discovered was a very pleasant way of passing the time on a long journey.

Before I show them to you, I would like to congratulate Ms. Jamie Alleyne, who placed first in the poetry section of the 2015 NILF Writing Competition.  I haven’t seen her poems yet, but certainly look forward to reading them in the near future.  You can keep abreast of their release on the NILF website by clicking Nature Island Literary Festival and also checking their Facebook page.

Meanwhile, my heartfelt creations are recorded below, for posterity’s sake, if nothing else.  I certainly delighted in this literary exercise and intend to pursue it again sometime.

  1. Springfield’s Splendour

Dominica is a beautiful green gem.

A mix of rich history and vibrant culture2004_1103Dominica0015

Complement its stunning emerald blend.

Nestled in the mountains near the rainforest

There sits a stately, comely, old estate

That epitomizes the essence of this place.

Springfield Plantation is her original name

And she is of an impressive old age

Her 18th century charm endures and fascinates.

I love to wander along her forest trails

While students of science search all over the grounds

Looking for large insects and rare plants.

In the nearby river, I feel completely at ease

This river pool at Springfield is a place where I spent many moments in meditation whenever I visit Springfield.

A bath in its refreshing waters does please

And washes away my cares until tomorrow.

The old estate whispers in the night

Her ghost stories could cause a terrible fright

But I have never ever been afraid.

Myriad sounds: squeaks, creaks and groans

Fill my imagination and capture my soul

As night falls all over her.

Mornings, I gaze down the verdant valley

And focus on the tallest Royal Palm.

It seems it’s been there for almost forever and a day.

The distant Caribbean Sea calls to me

Sending assurances that all is calm and bright

When I spend time in Springfield’s paradise.

As dawn is breaking on the old estate, I am always reminded of the magic and mystery of this beautiful place.

From Springfield, the view of the Antrim Valley down to the Caribbean sea always evokes a feeling of tranquility.

The old wooden beams hold secrets

But rustling trees in gentle breezes reveal

That Springfield is filled with enchanting magic and mystery

Which will never cease to charm and captivate me.

2.  Cry for the Nature Isle

A hike through the rainforest:

Whistling birds, stunning orchids, tall, tall trees

The trail is challenging, steep and somewhat remote.

Down a deep ravine, partially concealed by shades of green:

A rusting fridge and a pair of bald tires,

And a little further along, a recently cleared garden patch in chemical yellow.

I sigh for the Nature Isle.

An afternoon by the river:

Cool, refreshing, reviving,

Revelling in its fast, frigid, flow.

Swimming further upstream to a more accessible spot

Provokes a shock-

Picnickers have left plenty on its banks:

Styrofoam plates, plastic cups, chicken bones and rum bottles too.

Midstream, a hummingbird flits around a blue banana bag caught on a rock.

I weep for the Nature Isle.

A brisk stroll along the windswept Atlantic coast:

Wild waves crash onshore

Pulling in ubiquitous overgrown Sargassum seaweed

Carrying with it a flotsam and jetsam of plastics

Of all descriptions:

Abundant bottle caps, motor oil containers, a bait bucket from Virginia,

To name a few.

I sob for the Nature Isle.

A critically endangered turtle, needing to lay her eggs:

Searching for a once-familiar spot on the beach.

In the distance, a lone man wanders along the shoreline

Late at night, and when asked about his presence there,

Vaguely admits to “doing something wrong.”

The 1,000 pound Leatherback never had a chance;

Soon the species will be no more.

I howl for the Nature Isle.DSCF4390

A Boa Constrictor freely inhabits the suburban grassy terrain

And in the dry season, burns to death in an intentionally-set fire.

Iguana lizards cooked for lunch are enjoyed by all generations

Who savor their exquisite taste, despite laws and declining numbers.

I wail for the Nature Isle.

Climate change, global warming, pollution, DSCF4546

Thoughtlessness and selfishness most of all

Have taken precedence in this country of rare beauty, splendour

And sometime national pride.

If we don’t come together to preserve this precious place

Then I will have no choice but to constantly

Cry for the Nature Isle.

3. Dreams of Waitukubuli*

Hot, warm, cool waters

This forceful natural hot water shower at Tia's provides a strong massage for sore muscles

Strong smelling, soothing relief

A healthful respite.

Spouts seen on the sea

Secretive, gentle and  strong

Dive into the deeps.

Cascading torrentsDSCF1160

Flow in synchronicity-

Electricity.

Three emerald peaks

Silver clouds and sapphire sky

Tall is her body.

“Whoop-whoop” breaks silence

A common sound in the nightDSCF5438

Once upon a time.

*Waitukubuli (pronounced Why-too-KOO-boo-lee) is the Kalinago name for Dominica, which means “tall is her body.”

**The above three poems were submitted to the NILF Writing Competition in July 2015, several weeks before Tropical Storm Erika devastated the Nature Island – but the sentiments remain the same! Gwendominica

A Return to My Adopted Country, Dominica, One Month After TS Erika

This Canada Goose will soon be flying south, just me like, except that it is not headed for Dominica like me!

This Canada Goose will soon be flying south, except that it is not headed for Dominica like me! Photo taken near Loughborough Lake, Battersea Ontario.

I write this post with mixed emotions, as I make preparations to return to Dominica after a lengthy and lovely stay in Eastern Canada.  The Nature Island is drastically changed by TS Erika’s wrath and I am anxious to observe it for myself.

Be assured that I will be blogging about all that I see and do once I have settled back in to my adopted country.  I’ll give you my perspectives,in a positive way, as usual. As Dominica’s Prime Minister the Honourable Roosevelt Skerrit has firmly declared, the Nature Island “shall rise again!”  There is no doubt in my mind, and I will do whatever I can to assist with Dominica’s recovery.

Whether or not you live in this special place, I sincerely hope you will consider helping out too, as the rebuilding process has only just begun – and there is much to be done.  Government of Dominica-approved donation sites can be found here.

In the weeks to come, I will also be describing many of my wonderful

This Great Blue Heron is flying away, but his destination is very different from mine!

This Great Blue Heron is flying away, but his destination is very different from mine! Photo taken at Dog Lake, near Battersea Ontario.

experiences over the past three and a half months in my “home and native land.”  You will find those musings on my Canary Gal blog and they will also appear on my Facebook page, Gwendominica.

As I get ready to go back to this special island, there are a number of people to thank, both here and there, for all that they have done for me during my prolonged visit to Canada.

First and foremost, I am grateful to my brothers, Marc and Edwin who came to my aid when it became apparent that I would be here for a while longer.  Lots of good food and fun times with my siblings and their families helped to distract me from my worries about Dominica.

I don't see them too often, but when there is an occasion to spend time with my niece, Mara and my nephew Dallin, I enjoy being 'Aunite Gwen'.

I don’t see them too often, but when there is an occasion to spend time with my niece, Mara and my nephew Dallin, I enjoy being ‘Auntie Gwen’.

My long-time Canadian neighbour Sharon Freeman and her family set me up very well for my six week retreat at the Three Little Cottages and Freedom Farm on Dog Lake, near Battersea Ontario.  I had a fabulous time, completely immersed in nature in this Canadian wilderness location, also known as the Frontenac Arch, a UNESCO World

The granite cliffs on Dog Lake form part of the Canadian Shield. Photo taken just before sunset in a canoe on Dog Lake, Battersea Ontario.

The granite cliffs on Dog Lake form part of the Canadian Shield. Photo taken just before sunset in a canoe on Dog Lake, Battersea Ontario.

Biosphere Reserve.

Early morning on Dog Lake, Battersea Ontario was occasionally shared with other inhabitants of the area.

Early morning on Dog Lake, Battersea Ontario was occasionally shared with other inhabitants of the area.

I’ll be writing more about that experience very soon.  A few photos are included here, to pique your interest.

A long, lovely summer evening sunset after 9 p.m. on the shore of the New Minas Basin at Wolfville, Nova Scotia.

A long, lovely summer evening sunset after 9 p.m. on the shore of the New Minas Basin at Wolfville, Nova Scotia. I think the tide was coming in at that time.

A trip to Canada would never be complete without spending time ‘down east’, with my incredible Aunt Vivian and a few

I was thrilled to be in Nova Scotia for my Aunt Vivian's 91st birthday. It was one of several memorable occasions during my visit this year.

I was thrilled to be in Nova Scotia for my Aunt Vivian’s 91st birthday. It was one of several memorable occasions during my visit there this year.

A very long summer in eastern Canada found me on the beach at Awenda Provincial Park on Georgian Bay overthe September Labour Day Weekend!

A very long summer in eastern Canada found me on the beach at Awenda Provincial Park on Georgian Bay near Penatanguishene over the September Labour Day Weekend!

generations of amazing cousins.  Sincere thanks to Cousin Dwight and his wife Patricia for graciously rolling out the red carpet and  offering their home as my base for a two week stay in  beautiful Nova Scotia. I am grateful to all my Maritime ‘relations’ for their warm hospitality!

And I would be remiss if I did not acknowledge, with profound gratitude, the assistance of some neighbours and friends in Dominica over my extended summer ‘holiday’.  Police Officer Vernon Gordon regularly checked my home and surroundings to ensure that all was secure.  He even mopped up a small flood in my dining room the morning after TS Erika and contacted my landlord to make arrangements to fix the little hole in my roof.

Then there is Ursula Joseph, my long-time helper and friend who faithfully tended the apartment and kept everything ‘ship-shape’ in my absence.

My closest neighbours, Peter and Elizabeth Registe willingly harboured my little car in their garage.  Its safe shelter saved

me the worry of its exposure to the copious rainfall of the last couple of months, including the deluge of TS Erika. Now I just hope it will start after its prolonged ‘rest’. (Battery was disconnected and Julius, the neighbourhood mechanic is certain to set things right for me!)

It’s been a long, lovely summer, and without further ado, I will set my sights on whatever lies ahead. I will share some of my northern memories in due course, but first, I will go back ‘home’ to Dominica.  Don’t worry – the airport is open and the interior Imperial Road is cleared so that travellers can traverse the breadth of the island.

So here I go – God-willing and weather-permitting!

The Government of Canada Responds to the Humanitarian Crisis in Dominica, Following TS Erika

The Government of Canada is assisting the Relief Effort on Dominica in several ways.

The Government of Canada is assisting the Humanitarian Relief Effort on Dominica in several ways.

I was delighted to receive this reply from an official in Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada in response to a query I submitted last week. In the form email, I respectfully  requested aid for Dominica, following the total devastation caused by Tropical Storm Erika on August 27th, 2015:

“The Government of Canada, through [the Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development](DFATD), quickly responded to the devastation caused by Tropical Storm Erika in Dominica and has been supporting the emergency response efforts.

Following the disaster, Canada committed $135,000 to the Pan American Health Organization in order to help restore health services and emergency medical in affected areas, improve access to clean water and sanitation and ensure the provision of hygiene supplies.

Canada is also supporting the International Federation of the Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) Emergency Appeal for Dominica.

With Canada’s support, the IFRC and the Dominica Red Cross will respond to the immediate needs of over 10,000 people through cash transfers, basic household non-food items, shelter, health and psychosocial support, as well as water, sanitation and hygiene promotion activities.

The Government of Canada committed an additional $50,000 through the Canada Fund for Local Initiatives to provide relief and assistance affected households, as identified by the Government of Dominica.”

While the Canadian government’s contribution to the Relief Effort is greatly appreciated, kindly be reminded that millions of dollars are needed to restore the country to its pre- TS Erika state.  The Prime Minister of Dominica, Honourable Roosevelt Skerrit has said that the Nature Island has been set back by at least two decades.

Numerous other countries continue to assist Dominica in its overall recovery, which will be a lengthy and challenging process.

If you are in Toronto, Canada on Friday September 25th, be sure to attend this incredible concert in aid of Dominica!

If you are in Toronto, Canada on Friday September 25th, be sure to attend this incredible concert in aid of Dominica!

Canadians  and other citizens of the world: MUCH MORE HELP IS NEEDED. Your donations of any amount would be most welcome and you can refer to various government-approved charities and accounts by clicking here.

The critical humanitarian situation on Dominica is not going to resolve anytime soon.  You can follow developments on the Nature Island through coverage on Dominica News Online.

If we all assist in our own way – be it large or small- then we will be helping to restore the beautiful Nature Island of 70,000 inhabitants to its former renowned natural glory.  Thank you!

 

Fellow Canadians, Please Help Dominica to Recover from TS Erika’s Devastating ‘Blows’

Help Rebuild Dominica

Canadians in the Greater Toronto Area and further afield, please find it in your hearts to help the Nature Island and her hopeful citizens, who have suffered tremendously at the hands of TS Erika.

This post is directed specifically at fellow countrymen and women in Canada. However, I urge readers all over the world to consider contributing to the Relief Effort  in Dominica with donations or contributions through aid organizations such as the International Red Cross  (specify Dominica) or the Government of Dominica’s special accounts in various currencies . Further information can be found by clicking Office of the Prime Minister of Dominica – TS Erika Recovery and Reconstruction Fund.

You may already know that Dominica, like Canada, is a member of the Commonwealth of Nations.  But did you know that thousands of Dominicans live in Canada?  Despite their relocation, they maintain very close ties with their homeland, the Nature Island, as evidenced by the proactive Commonwealth of Dominica Ontario Association.  I have met many Dominican-Canadians over the past 18 years, and they are very appreciative of the diverse opportunities they have had in this large northern land.  The only complaint is a unanimous one: the cold!  I can certainly empathize with that.

I am not sure how many Canadians reside on the Nature Isle.  The few with whom I am acquainted have lived there for more than a decade.  Other friends have returned to Canada, but keep up ties and interest in this beautiful rainforested land that was their  home for a while.

While media coverage has been sadly lacking since the passage of TS Erika completely destroyed Dominica on August 27th, international aid has arrived from many countries – both large and small.  The country’s nearest neighbours, comprised of members of CARICOM and French Overseas Departments were quick to assist in myriad ways. British and Dutch relief ships have brought in some badly needed supplies and medical personnel.  Unfortunately,  response to this crisis has been slow from developed countries such as Canada.  Much more humanitarian aid and  support is required to help this tiny country of 70,000 people to get back on its feet.

 You may be aware that about 30  people died  and others are still missing.  People have lost loved ones, homes and sources of employment.  The demolished infrastructure is estimated at over one billion dollars to reconstruct.  The island’s Douglas-Charles airport requires $ 40 million to rebuild to become fully operational again. Agriculture, the country’s economic mainstay is no more. Hundreds of millions of dollars are desperately needed to recover from all aspects of this disaster.
People are suffering.  Two entire villages have to be relocated, as they were reduced to rubble. The need for clean water  is urgent, as gastroenteritis is becoming a prevalent health condition. Other essentials for daily living are now a critical concern.  One need only read up-to-date news reports from Dominica to gain appreciation for the shocking aftermath of this natural disaster at Dominica News Online.

General awareness of this dire situation in Canada is almost non-existent.  It would be most appreciated if the Government of Canada would consider the crisis in Dominica as a worthy area for humanitarian assistance to aid in this massive recovery effort. I attempted to call the Department of Foreign Affairs yesterday and was not successful in relaying my message by phone.  However, I did fill out a form email letter, requesting humanitarian aid for Dominica. If you would like to do the same, it could only help increase awareness about the crisis on the Nature Island.  Click here to write to  Canada. Department of Foreign Affairs .

Thankfully, there are some organizations such as the Toronto-based Commonwealth of Dominica Ontario Association (CDOA)who are spearheading a massive fundraisingGetAttachment campaign, organizing benefit concerts and collecting requested items to be sent to Dominica.  In fact, two containers are be shipped to Dominica this weekend, and it is likely another one will be sent to the Nature Island in the near future.  They have raised over $50,000 of their $100,000 CAD goal, thanks to donations both large and small to their charitable initiative.  This drive is recognized by the Government of Dominica.  Please clink on the link above to the CDOA to find out more and/or make a donation to the Relief and Recovery Effort.

As well, the Rotary Club of Ottawa South has close ties with the Nature Isle, and is organizing events and raising funds in aid of Dominica’s plight.  If you live in the Nation’s Capital, you might like to check them out.

As a Canadian who has resided on Dominica for more than 18 years, I will do all that I can to help those in my adopted home.  Fellow countrymen and women, you

Gwedominica sends plenty of good vibes to her adopted country, Dominica from her native land, Canada on a late summer afternoon.

Gwendominica sends plenty of good vibes to her adopted country, Dominica, from her native land, Canada on a sunshine-filled summer afternoon.

may not live there, you may not know much about the Nature Island, but I assure you that it is one of the most pristine places in the world, and that is why I live there. It has given me an improved quality of life and numerous opportunities for adventure in its sensational surroundings. You can find out more by reading Ti Domnik Tales, which has over 150 posts about this lovely land!  Its warm friendly people may be small in number compared to other countries, but they definitely deserve a helping hand to recover from this catastrophic natural disaster.

Please find it in your hearts to help  Dominica in its time of need.  Thank you!!!