Hamlet ‘Visits’ Dominica: a Sensational Grand Finale for the Nature Island Literary Festival 2014

DSCF3183In early September, I prepared myself for the grand finale of this year’s Literary Festival program of plays: London’s Globe Theatre Troupe was bringing  Hamlet, Prince of Denmark to Dominica on their world tour to celebrate 450 years since Shakespeare’s birth!  The Nature Island was actually the 44th country on their route, which would take the cast, crew and producers to more than 200

"The Play's the Thing" is a common expression in the English language that originated from Shakespeare's pen in lines spoken by the play's protagonist in Hamlet, Act II, Scene 2, lines 603-605. Its original meaning is very intriguing - read it  (or see it) and find out why!

“The Play’s the Thing,” this year’s Lit Fest theme is a common expression in the English language. It originated from Shakespeare’s pen in lines spoken by the play’s protagonist in Hamlet, Act II, Scene 2, lines 603-605. Its original meaning is very intriguing – read it (or see it) and find out why!

countries over a two-year period.  They had been to Canada in early August, and had performed two shows in one day at Prescott, Ontario, a small town about one and a half hours east of Kingston, my home town.  I read that tickets sold out in less than an hour!  For a country the size of Canada, very few people had the unique privilege of attending this special production.  And to think  that this proud Canadian was able to secure  one ticket to a sold-out show for 600 people in Dominica!  Therefore, I was very motivated to do my homework by reviewing the entire play, researching its background, and studying important themes, monologues and other literary devices so that I could better appreciate this incredible once-in-a-lifetime experience.

The venue, the Arawak House of Culture is the only big indoor theatre in Roseau . Unfortunately, it is a difficult space for me (to sing on-stage or to sit in the house) because of my

The Arawak House of Culture had very few empty seats at 7 p.m., when the play commenced.  Hamlet was sold out in Roseau Dominica!

The Arawak House of Culture had very few empty seats at 7 p.m., when the play commenced. Hamlet was sold out in Roseau Dominica!

environmental health challenges and allergies.  Therefore, I had to take good care of myself before attending the play, knowing that I would not feel well for a few days afterwards.  I have no regrets. I consider that auspicious evening to be one of the highlights of my life in Dominica.  There were some other pleasant surprises that night, as well as  the superb performance of Hamlet that I can never forget.

 I am so proud of my former Orion Academy Eng Lit students Edward and Amanda.  They both placed in the top 10 in Dominica in theri regional exams and have gone on to university. It was delight to see them at Hamlet!

I am so proud of my former Orion Academy Eng Lit students, Edward and Amanda. They both placed in the top 10 in Dominica in their regional exams in 2008. They have since gone on to university. It was a delight to see them at Hamlet!

I did arrive early to claim a ‘rush’ seat, and I am glad I did so, because about 600 other patrons soon filled the first floor and upper level balcony of the theatre. I was thrilled to see two of my former senior students in English Literature in attendance.  In their class at Orion Academy, we had studied Macbeth and I believe we all had a lot of fun going through it.  I certainly enjoyed it, and I would like to think that based on the high

Liz and Arun (pictured here) surely influenced their son Dylan about the wonders of Shakespeare. He was another of my brilliant Eng Lit students who seemed to enjoy Merchant of Venice in our senior Eng Lit class.  He graduated from Orion in 2011 and is now at university in the U.S.

Liz and Arun (pictured here) surely influenced their son Dylan about the wonders of Shakespeare. He was another of my brilliant students who seemed to enjoy Merchant of Venice in his senior Eng Lit class. He graduated with high honours from Orion in 2011 and is now at university in the U.S.

scores in their regional exams, they must have gotten a thing or two out of it!

Before the play began, I tried to determine if picture-taking was permitted.  It seemed as if it was not allowed,  so I have no shots of the actors in action.  However, it was mentioned by a member of the troupe at the start of the show that they requested “no flash.” Nevertheless, I did not take chances, and as such, have few photos  for this momentous occasion.  But you can see some good ones on the Nature Island Literary Festival Face Book Page, by clicking here.

Just minutes before the show began, I examined the set with interest.  It was very simple in design, which is understandable, as the troupe would be “on the road” for the better part of two years!  I was curious to see what they would do with scant props on the modest stage, and it didn’t take long to find out! A cast of 12 covered about 20 roles in total.  The four crew members easily moved around the set to rearrange, take away or add props that were relevant to each scene in the five-act play.  They even dressed the part and fit right in for crowd scenes and lovely lighthearted Elizabethan period  songs and dances.  Some of the actors played instruments as well that added  a gaiety to the atmosphere of what is generally considered an extremely sombre “tragedy.”.As well, some of the house lights stayed on, providing a more realistic feel for the audience about the era in which the play was originally performed (daylight, usually – no electricity in the early 1600’s!).

The simple set of The Globe's  touring production of Hamlet did not detract from the words and action on stage.

The simple set of The Globe’s touring production of Hamlet did not detract from the words and action on stage.

It took  me the first scene to get into the rhythm of the speech patterns of the play: plentiful ‘blank verse‘, smatterings of rhyming couplets, and occasional prose in cultivated, well-articulated British accents required a few moments  of adjustment for my  ears.

Hamlet is indeed a very dark play in the most macabre ways, replete with a ghost, murders, incest, betrayal, desertion, deception, trickery, suicide,  indecision, revenge, depression,  madness (real and feigned) and anger figuring prominently throughout (until the end of the very final scene in Act 5) . However, the directors, with their brilliant cast truly succeeded in making the  very tragic themes and actions far from morose. The quick pace of the play, the lighter interludes during the scene changes with music and song and the deft movements of the actors back and forth  across the downstage areas  (including a mesmerizing sword duel to the death!) aided in holding the audience’s rapt attention for about 2 hours and 40 minutes, with one 15 minute intermission.  While all the actors were absolutely sensational, the character of Hamlet, performed by Naeem Hayat was extraordinarily outstanding in his flawless delivery of lines and ceaseless energetic movements that at times made me think I was an onlooker in the court of King Claudius ( his uncle) and Queen Gertrude (his mother)!  This Globe to Globe production was entirely believable, entertaining and skilfully executed in the manner in which Shakespeare’s  thoughtfully crafted creation was delivered to the “observers.”

But there were some other memorable moments offstage, that also added to my unforgettable experience of that glorious night at the theatre.  Apart from seeing former students in the house, I was astonished when the lady seated beside me mentioned that the works of Shakespeare rest beside the Bible on her nightstand, for frequent reference.  After a moment, I realized that it made sense to ponder “the Bard’s” writings often.   I had continually reminded students during my days of teaching about Shakespeare at Orion Academy   that his themes are universal and timeless. They apply to any era, any place, any person, anywhere!

Hamlet is filled with famous phrases and idioms that have slipped into the everyday English language.  Often, when we say them, we don’t even think of their origin.  However, I was quite surprised when, in West Indian style, members of the audience either chuckled or recited aloud whatever well-known saying was being expressed on stage. Examples include:

To be, or not to be: that is the question”. – (Act III, Scene I); “Neither a borrower nor a lender be”. – (Act I, Scene III); “This above all: to thine own self be true”. – (Act I, Scene III); “Though this be madness, yet there is method in ‘t.”. – (Act II, Scene II); “The lady doth protest too much, methinks”. – (Act III, Scene II ); “In my mind’s eye”. – (Act I, Scene II); and several others.  In fact, the theme of this year’s Literary Festival: “The play ‘s the thing…”. – (Act II, Scene II),  has  a more dire meaning, if you read the line in context  of what proceeds and follows it. You can find more well-known expressions from Hamlet right here. I was also amazed at the number of theatre-goers who recited parts of Hamlet’s famous soliloquy,”‘To be or not to be” along with the actor.  While I was duly impressed with this group recitation, I don’t believe it affected the words and actions of Hamlet on-stage! I am convinced that Mr. Hayat “became” Hamlet,  because of his dlp (dead-letter-perfect) line delivery and precisely timed actions!

The of Hamlet acknowledges thanks from Dr. Bully post-performance. Hamlet, the character played by Naeem Hayat is second from the right.

The cast  of Hamlet acknowledges an expression of thanks from Dr. Bully  (off-stage) post-performance.  Naeem Hayat, the actor who played Hamlet is second from the right.

I did wonder if there were audience members who  were possibly confused when one actor assumed another role, with only slight changes to the costume. For example, Rawiri Paratene, who played King Claudius, as well as the ghost of King Hamlet might have befuddled a few – for a short while only, I hope.  For me, the flexibility of the cast in switching parts is worthy of the highest admiration for their theatrical skills. However, I was concerned about a young  man seated in front of me who was a recent high school graduate.  He was unfamiliar with the play and  I did sense his confusion. I asked him at the interval how it was going for him.  He admitted that it was a bit challenging, after which I urged him to read the play as soon as possible! I think he was in awe of the spectacle of such a superb production though, as was everyone else. A prolonged standing ovation at the end of it confirmed the audience’s collective appreciation of this unforgettable presentation!

It was wonderful to observe the multiracial cast of The Globe Theatre’s Touring Company of London putting on this phenomenal performance of  Hamlet in Dominica.  And to think they would do it many times over in other parts of the planet as they proceed with their world tour!  Dramatic works such as those of Shakespeare do contain timeless universal themes and messages for all to enjoy, read, perform,  ponder and/or discuss, regardless of background, culture, age or experience.  This is also evident in the Caribbean films and plays that I attended during the Literary Festival’s August offerings.  You can read that report here.

This year, the Nature Island Literary Festival definitely affirmed that “the play’s the thing.” Thanks again to Dr. Alwin Bully and the entire Committee for making an extraordinary late-summer night’s dream come true!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Audiences Delight in Superb Performances at Dominica’s 7th annual Nature Island Literary Festival

DSCF3168

Literary enthusiasts (myself included!) were fortunate to be in Roseau Dominica between August 7th and September 7th, 2014 for another celebration of the Nature Island Literary Festival, now in its seventh year.  Thanks to Chair Dr.

Dr. Alwin Bully is a man with a plan to promote arts and culture in Dominica. By all accounts, he is succeeding, thanks to his dedication and determination!

Dr. Alwin Bully is a man with a plan to promote arts and culture in Dominica. By all accounts, he is succeeding, thanks to his dedication and determination. As for theatre, he’s lived and breathed all aspects of it for 50 years!

Alwin Bully and other members of the Nature Island Literary Festival (NILF) Committee, we appreciated unique opportunities to attend some wonderful Caribbean plays and films, which culminated in an extraordinary viewing of the Globe Theatre Touring Company of Londons production of Shakespeare’s DSCF3183Hamlet, Prince of Denmark. This special performance in recognition of the 450th anniversary of the birth of “The Bard” offered Dominicans an opportunity to see a world-class theatre troupe for the first time in over 50 years. You can read my report about that unforgettable production right here.

Because I was still recovering from Chikungunya and had recently returned from an exciting but exhausting trip to Canada, I decided to pass on the workshops, extra sessions  and a commemorative slave protest walk that were offered at NILF

this year.  It was my intention to focus strictly on the performance media, with one regrettable exception, Dr. Bully’s 1970’s creation, The Ruler.  Unfortunately, my allergies and environmental health challenges prevent me from spending too much time in the Arawak House of Culture, the venue where this dramatic work was being performed.  However,  I was thrilled to learn that The Ruler is recognized internationally, and  is soon to be published in five languages!  I hope to catch this renowned piece another time, somewhere on the planet. For now, I had to gear up to see Hamlet  in that particular performance space!

On the first Saturday evening of the Literary Festival, I arrived early at the Alliance Francaise auditorium to get a good seat near the front of the room for the presentation of “Lady of Parham” by playwright David Edgecombe.

The cast of the UVI Theatre discuss the legend of the Land of Parham before re-enacting it - a play within a play!

The cast of the UVI Theatre discuss the legend of the Lady of Parham before re-enacting it – a play within a play!

The  troupe of actors, hailing from the University of the Virgin Islands (UVI) Theatre in St. Thomas held me and the packed house spellbound as they unravelled the legend of the mysterious ghost from Parham village in Antigua.  I was so profoundly affected by their dramatic reenactment of this  intriguing story that my dreams vividly  displayed

These young actors from the UVI Theatre portrayed their characters well in Lady of Parham.

These versatile young actors from the UVI Theatre entertained as 17th and 19th century and well as contemporary  characters  in Lady of Parham.

unearthly things that night!

The two characters in Siswe Banzi is Dead convincingly portrayed their challenging roles set during the apartheid in South Africa.

The two actors in Siswe Banzi is Dead convincingly portrayed their challenging roles set during the apartheid in South Africa.

On the Sunday of the Festival, I returned for more.  This time, I feasted on two plays in one day – a record for me!  The first was performed under the large tent on the shady  grounds of the University of West Indies Open Campus.  ‘Siswe Banzi is Dead‘, with its two sensational actors  from Anguilla’s Sunshine Theatre  Company perfectly presented their very demanding roles.  They captivated the small but supportive audience as the temperature climbed that sweltering afternoon. Playwright Athul Fugard’s powerful South African play, which premiered in Cape Town in the early 1970’s further  opened my eyes about injustice, corruption,  and  the desperation of oppressed people during the apartheid.

One of my few disappointments during this years Lit Fest was the absence of audience during Sunday afternoon's performance of 'Siswe Banzi is Dead'.  The viewing of this important South African play is an absolute 'must' for young and old!

One of my few disappointments during this year’s Lit Fest was the absence of audience during Sunday afternoon’s performance of ‘Siswe Banzi is Dead’. The viewing of this important South African play is an absolute ‘must’ for young and old!

Dr. Alwin Bully, Ni Lit Fest Chair commends actors for their sensational performance.

Dr. Alwin Bully,  Lit Fest Chair commends the actors from the Sunshine Theatre Company in Anguilla  for their sensational performance.

The small crowd quietly left the tent in sombre and sober moods, as we reflected on the realistic atmosphere and setting of this once controversial dramatic work. Its themes still resonate today in many parts of the world, representing a sad  and shameful reality for humankind that  persists into the 21st century.

Pearle Christian (r) shares some of her experiences over 20 years as Director of the Sixth Form Sisserou Singers.  Two of her wonderful choristers, who are also superb soloists, are seated with her.

Pearle Christian  (2nd from r) shares some of her experiences over 20 years as Director of the Sixth Form Sisserou Singers. Three of her wonderful choristers are seated around her. Dr. Shuyler Esprit (l) chaired the session.

I took a brief reprieve before the second play to hear about local musical theatre, with respect to the renowned Sixth Form Sisserou Singers and their highly regarded director, Ms. Pearle Christian.  They had just celebrated their 20th anniversary concert and I unfortunately missed that one as I was overseas.  However, I have heard/watched them many times and I can tell you that their first-rate shows are of a high standard, as well as being very entertaining.  ‘Aunty Pearle’, as she is affectionately known by her younger choristers is an exceptionally creative and skilled musician who knows how to bring Dominica’s traditional oral/storytelling culture to life through musical renditions.  The set of songs  that she composes (and writes lyrics in Creole!) are choreographed, everyone has a little solo part and beautiful cultural costumes are created to complement the production.  Heartfelt congratulations to Pearle for her tireless efforts and boundless enthusiasm as a cultural officer ( recently retired), musician, teacher, choral conductor and friend to many who share her interests in the performing arts!

When that presentation was over, I drove home quickly to change and then return for the evening’s offering at the Alliance Francaise auditorium. Dr. Bully had earlier cautioned Lit Fest attendees that  this play, entitled ‘The World Spin One Way‘ by Antiguan Dobrene O’Marde , was ‘R’ rated (by some)! Suffice to say that the place was packed with keen and curious theatre-goers.  Mr. O’Marde is no stranger to Dominica, having addressed the Lit Fest in 2013 as a prolific Caribbean writer.  While there was considerable sexual overtone in the play, I found it subtle and well-suited to the universal themes of the ups and downs of love affairs (pun intended!), as well as betrayal, misunderstandings and nostalgia about past relationships.  The two main characters created

These tow main characters in 'The World Spin One Way' could makes sparks fly easily, with the words from O'Marde's script!

These two main characters in ‘The World Spin One Way’ could make sparks fly easily, with  provocative lines from O’Marde’s script!

plentiful tension that kept the audience hanging on to their every word, wondering how it would all turn out.  Of course, I am not going to tell you – you really must see it, or at least read it!

During the week that followed these plays, the literary focus turned to Caribbean cinema, equally as compelling and thought-provoking as live theatre.  I thoroughly enjoyed the biographical documentary about Nobel Prize winner/poet  laureate Derek Walcott of St. Lucia, which was compiled by filmmaker Ms. Ida Does of  Surinam. The diverse literary and artistic accomplishments of this St. Lucian octogenarian are recognized the world over, and Dominica was delighted when he attended and participated in the 1st Nature Island Literary Festival in 2008!  I had the honour of teaching some of his poems and shorter dramatic works when I taught English Literature at Orion Academy several years ago. It was very exciting to have an in-depth look at this esteemed Caribbean author, and Ms. Does’s cinematic overview gave me an even greater appreciation for and understanding of  the broad range of his artistic works.  I walked away from that showing with the words from his poem, Love After Love resonating in my head.  Although I had provided detached professional guidance to my students about its meaning and construction,  it was from this moment on that this  significant poem  registered  on a personal level, having  just heard Mr. Walcott read it  aloud in this film!

The second cinematic offering later in the week was produced by Barbadian filmmaker Russell Watson.  His creation, entitled A Hand Full of Dirt starred none other than Dominica’s own renowned artiste, Alwin Bully! The story chronicles the lives of three generations of men in one family and explores their separate and overlapping challenges in a Caribbean and an American setting.  It is the kind of feature film that holds universal appeal, as demonstrated when it received the ‘Audience Choice’ award at the ReelWorld Film Festival in Toronto in 2011.  This was in fact my second viewing of the work.  Like a good book, I never mind seeing a well scripted and performed play or film more than once – it reinforces the themes and I often gain further insight into the issues that are raised within. This 90 minute screening was a most enjoyable finish for my week of plays and films during the Literary Festival.

With the near completion of my personal Literary Festival agenda, I felt inspired to get ready for Hamlet!  I had about three weeks to do my homework, so that I would enjoy this Shakespearian tragedy to the max!

To Dr. Alwin Bully and Nature Island Literary Festival Committee: Please accept my profound gratitude for the gifts of drama and film that were offered to residents of Dominica this year. Because of your exceptional efforts, I feel truly blessed to have had opportunities to see some of the  finest literary creations in the Caribbean.  Thank you!!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Theatre Director Alwin Bully Stages ‘A Tempest’ in Roseau Dominica

The Dominican production of Aime Cesaire's 'A Tempest' was directed by Alwin Bully and starred J. Grimner and Prospero and Haxey Emmanuel Salamant as Caliban.

The Dominican production of Aime Cesaire’s ‘A Tempest’ was directed by Alwin Bully and starred J. Grimner (l) as Prospero and  Emanuel Haxey Salamat as Caliban.

As DOMFESTA  2013 arts activities concluded on the Nature Island, I attended its final theatrical  production, which I thoroughly enjoyed. It consisted  of  the late Martinican  playwright Aimé Césaire‘s ‘A Tempest‘ (1969), which was held at the Alliance Française de la Dominique   from June 14 -16. Renowned Caribbean cultural icon and son-of-the-soil Dr. Alwin Bully directed this ambitious representation with a seasoned cast of actors from locally based theatre troupe La Cour Des Arts de la Dominique.  This play’s familiar title, characters’ names and plot-line do intentionally resemble Shakespeare’s well-known work called ‘The Tempest, with some unique twists.

As I had not previously studied or taught this Shakespearian play, I was glad that I had a chance to read the synopsis before going to the production. I also  looked up Césaire’s adaptation to get a feel for  his dramatic style and what could possibly happen on the stage. In March, I did have the privilege of seeing famous French actor Jacques Martial portray the sentiments of  Césaire’s  poem Notebook of a Return to the Native Land (1939) at the Arawak house of Culture in Roseau.   Also,  Gildas Lefèvre, my French conversation instructor at Alliance Franςaise gave me a bit of background about Césaire’s  exceptional life (1913-2008) and recurrent themes in his artistic and political endeavors.

Césaire was a contemporary poet, playwright and a political and social activist.  He  cleverly adapted Shakespeare’s timeless dramatic work so that it incorporated themes such as colonialism, slavery, loss of identity and racism. According to the performance’s playbill, “He was the first activist to claim the rights of Black People in the French colonies, calling on them to recognize and be proud of their history, culture and values.”  He even created a concept called “Negritude“, which refers to  taking pride in one’s African origins and rejecting assimilation into European or colonial culture.

Even before the play formally began, the actors mulled about on or near the simple stage, chatted among themselves and even talked to

Before the play began, the actors came onto or around the stage, which created an intimate  andinformal rapport with the audience.

Before the play began, the actors came onto or around the stage, which created an intimate and casual rapport with the audience.

members of the audience.  At first, I was surprised by this activity, but then I realised that it enhanced the intimacy of this intense presentation.  The almost “theatre-in-the-round’ arrangement of the seats on either side and in front of the stage also enabled the onlookers to feel as if they were a part of the action.  I could sense the energy emanating from all the

Caliban portrayed his role as the rebellious slave very convincingly. Stephano is in the background..  Stephano is

Caliban portrayed his powerful role as the rebellious slave very convincingly. Stephano is in the background.

characters in the Prologue, when they were  ‘given their masks’ (parts) by Ashworth Simon, who acted as the Master of Ceremonies.

From the first scene,  where a fierce storm shipwrecks a group of people on an island, the audience was spellbound.  The little boy sitting behind me  was so drawn in that he grabbed the back of my chair (and sometimes me!) in suspense.  From that point, the lines between the characters with the colonial ‘attitude’ and the resistant slaves were well articulated through powerful dialogue and precise movements from on the stage, in front or near it and occasionally in the aisles directly beside  members of the audience!

Caliban (l) faces Prospero his oppressor  with courage, if not results!

Caliban (l) faces Prospero, his oppressor with courage and conviction.

The two protagonists were absolutely outstanding in the portrayal of their roles: Prospero, the typical colonial stereotype played by J. Grimner and Caliban, the angry and  rebellious slave played by  Emanuel Haxey Salamat were completely believable in  words and actions.  They certainly created considerable dramatic tension as they railed at each other with their divergent opinions on slavery and human rights. At the same time, Grimner’s part permitted comic relief through his deployment of ‘magic’ and acerbic wit.  With superb diction and powerful voices, these  two well-known Dominican performers

\J. Grimner as Prospero was completely in character as a conniving colonial in this demanding role.

J. Grimner as Prospero was always in character as an European colonialist in this demanding lead role.

The engagement and  marriage of Prospero's daughter Miranda, played by Justina Worrell to Prince Ferdinand, played by Cornell Linton was a delightful sub-plot.

The engagement  of Prospero’s daughter Miranda, played by Justina Worrell to Prince Ferdinand, played by Cornell Linton was a delightful sub-plot.

presented the issues that concerned playwright Césaire  through the point-of-view of Caliban.

The subservient slave Ariel (r) always did as Prospero commanded.  His character, played by Lester Guye, was in complete contrat to the rebellious Caliban.

The subservient slave Ariel (r) always did as Prospero commanded. His character, played by Lester Guye, was in complete contrast to the rebellious Caliban.

Additionally,  I understand that Director Bully also ensured that the actors had a  firm grasp of the above-mentioned complex themes that arise in A Tempest.  Throughout the play, this sombre subject was  often seasoned with humor.  While the title alone was suggestive of the mood that permeated the play, there were a number of comic scenes that kept the audience laughing while “reading between the lines’.

It was obvious that many hours of rehearsal and preparation time were devoted to bringing this play to life.  All 21 actors appeared to be DLP (dead-letter-perfect) in the execution of their lines.  They seemed to assume their roles very naturally, which I know only comes with extensive preparation and practise. I also appreciated the extra artistic touches:  dramatic and colourful stage make-up; graceful dances and other  smoothly choreographed movements; wonderful musical accompaniment from guitarist Tyson Johnson and African drummer Ras Algie; lighting which accentuated the action on stage; and songs that reinforced the themes  with repeated melodies.

Sonia Riviere (l)played a trouser-role as the sensible Gonzalo. The drunken French colonialist Stephano played by Steve Williams delighted the audience with his comical character.

Sonia Riviere (l)played a trouser-role as the sensible Gonzalo. The drunken French colonialist Stephano played by Curtis Clarendon delighted the audience with his comical character.

The final scene of 'A Tempest' had the complete cast on stage.

The complete cast was on stage  to take their bows at the play’s conclusion.

When the show ended about three hours after it began, it was obvious that the audience was well entertained and instructed by this high-calibre production.  Congratulations to Director Alwin Bully, as well as the entire cast and crew of  A Tempest for a superb performance of this challenging play.  Aimé Césaire (RIP) would be proud.

Master of Ceremonies Ashworth Simon also played the role of Esha, who made some fearful pronouncements.

Master of Ceremonies Ashworth Simon (front) also played the role of Esha, who made some notable pronouncements.